Now, that’s what I call a low tide!

Great walk along the sea front today and the tide was as low – no, correction – lower than I have seen it in the three years that we have lived in Clevedon.

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I’ve not seen the supports for the struts of the pier before, nor seen the sandbank sticking up through the mud without a covering of water. We were recently told that the metal supports were originally narrow gauge rail tracks being recycled, which explains why they look so delicate. You can also see in one of the photos how the appartments at the old Rock Hotel are still being built. Work has been progressing for at least two full years, so maybe by Christmas…

Things have gone a little quicker on Hill Road, where the new mini-Sainsbury store has just opened. I’m not a great fan of supermarket chains, but it does add to the range of products you can buy on Hill Road. The One Stop store round the corner has just been refurbished too – presumably because of the competition of a new store. I hadn’t realised that One Stop is a subsidiary of Tesco, although the branding in the store is now much more like Tesco’s branding. Very interesting – I had assumed it was an independent store.

Back to the estuary… Lovely to see the marine geography so clearly exposed further down the coast.

A similar low tide yesterday caused some local excitement when some geocachers went out onto the mud and got stuck to some degree. I think it was more panic from observers than a real risk, but the emergency services were called in  to rescue them: we heard sirens steadily throughout the afternoon and wondered what was occurring.

Today’s walk was to show our current Airbnb guest, a student with the Bristol Groundschool, the local sights. It is so nice to meet people of different nationalities, and to hear their stories and how they have become pilots. So far we have hosted students from the UK, Italy, France, Denmark, Hungary, Norway and Poland, and we’ve only been in business for a few months. It’s so nice to hear from the European students that their experience of the UK is far superior to their expectations: the legend of football hooligans, hen and stag parties and nightclubbing holidays in the sun has sadly led to low opinions of the British (or to be fair, the English) abroad.

I do realise that this post is slightly random, but then so is life!

Clevedon – World Heritage Site?

pier and clouds august 13

 

Back in July there was local news that Clevedon Council could apply for World Heritage Site status for the seafront, and although  haven’t heard any more about this recently, I’m hoping that they have.

It’s an interesting and on the face of it extraordinary step that would equate a smallish North somerset town few people outside the area have heard of with other world heritage sites.  The beautiful pier is a key draw, and you quite often see the town featured in film and television – most recently Broadchurch with David Tennant, but the town has had a small but devoted following since the days of the great Victorian poets.  Tennyson and Coleridge both lived here, and the locally famous Poet’s Walk coastal path is named in their honour.  Much of the town, including the seafront, is little changed from Victorian times, full of quiet charms. There are many vantage points from which spectacular views across the Bristol Channel to Wales and to the Mendip Hills spread out in front of you.  Try walking up (or down) the Zig Zag footpath between Hill Road and Dial Hill Road for some of the best.  If you are here in the evening, join the photographers who line the seafront for the spectacular sunset shots across the estuary.

We have the fantastic Curzon Community Cinema, which is well worth a visit. All the current films in a beautiful original interior.  Not to be missed. Great shops and cafes on Hill Road and in the town, and some lovely restaurants.  And a great number of parks and footpaths which mean that no road is a dead end and no two walks are ever quite the same.  The older streets are full of statuesque Victorian houses, in the main built by the merchants of Bristol, so embellished with individual architectural features which anyone who likes buildings will find delightful.

If you haven’t visited yet, you should. We are a 30 minute bus ride from Bristol. and a bus goes from Temple Meads station to the town.  Don’t expect wild excitement, but if quiet charms are to your taste, you’ll love it.

And we may be a World Heritage site by the time you get here!